The David Steen Archive | The Official Trailer

  • Starring: David Steen
  • Guest appearance by: Patrick Steel
  • Filmed, Directed and Produced by: Patrick Steel
  • Original Music by: Ben Robbins

James Coburn and Sophia Loren

JAMES COBURN & SOPHIA LOREN, ANTIGUA, 1978

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Elizabeth Taylor – ‘David Steen in the process of Photographing Elizabeth Taylor’

PHOTOGRAPHER DAVID STEEN WITH ELIZABETH TAYLOR IN HER DRESSING ROOM, ELSTREE STUDIOS, ENGLAND, 1963

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THE EARRING FEATURED IN THE PHOTOGRAPH WAS PART OF A PAIR OF EMERALD-AND-DIAMOND EAR PENDANTS BY BULGARI, 1960, A GIFT FROM RICHARD BURTON. SHE WORE THEM AT THE PARIS PREMIERE OF ‘LAWRENCE OF ARABIA’ IN 1962, SHE WORE THEM TO GREET QUEEN ELIZABETH IN WASHINGTON, IN 1976 AND THEY WERE PART OF HER COSTUME IN THE V.I.P.s.

 

Dame Elizabeth Rosemond “Liz” Taylor, DBE (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011) was a British-American actress. From her early years as a child star with MGM, she became one of the great screen actresses of Hollywood’s Golden Age. As one of the world’s most famous film stars, Taylor was recognized for her acting ability and for her glamorous lifestyle, beauty and distinctive violet eyes.

National Velvet (1944) was Taylor’s first success and she starred in Father of the Bride (1950), A Place in the Sun (1951), Giant (1956), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) and Suddenly, Last Summer (1959). She won the Academy Award for Best Actress for Butterfield 8 (1960), played the title role in Cleopatra (1963) and married her co-star Richard Burton. They appeared together in 11 films, including Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), for which Taylor won a second Academy Award. From the mid-1970s, she appeared less frequently in film and made occasional appearances in television and theatre.

Her much publicised personal life included eight marriages and several life-threatening illnesses. From the mid-1980s, Taylor championed HIV and AIDS programs; she co-founded the American Foundation for AIDS Research in 1985 and the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation in 1993. She received the Presidential Citizens Medal, the Legion of Honour, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award and a Life Achievement Award from the American Film Institute, who named her seventh on their list of the “Greatest American Screen Legends”.

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Michael Caine – Rare Photographic Print of Michael Caine | Black & White Photograph | Unseen Photo

MICHAEL CAINE, MAYFAIR, LONDON, FEBRUARY, 1981

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IMPORTANT NOTES:

THIS IMAGE WAS ONLY RECENTLY UNEARTHED FROM THE ARCHIVE AND HAS NEVER BEEN SEEN, PUBLISHED OR PRINTED BEFORE. IMAGE RELEASED 4TH JANUARY, 2013.

THE WATERMARK AND THE SIGNATURE ON THE IMAGE WILL NOT BE PRESENT ON AN ORIGINAL PRINT.

Sir Michael Caine, CBE (born Maurice Joseph Micklewhite on 14 March 1933) is an English actor and author. Renowned for his distinctive Cockney accent, Caine has appeared in over one hundred films and is one of Britain’s most recognisable actors.

He made his breakthrough in the 1960s with starring roles in a number of British films, including, Zulu (1964), The Ipcress File (1965), Alfie (1966), The Italian Job (1969), and Battle of Britain (1969). His most notable roles in the 1970s included, Get Carter (1971), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), and A Bridge Too Far (1978). He achieved critical success in the 1980s, with Educating Rita (1983) earning him the BAFTA and Golden Globe Award for Best Actor, and in 1986 he received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Hannah and Her Sisters.

Caine played a British con-man in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), and Ebenezer Scrooge in The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992). He received his second Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for The Cider House Rules (1999). Caine played Nigel Powers in the 2002 parody Austin Powers in Goldmember, and more recently portrayed Alfred Pennyworth, the butler in Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Trilogy. He also appeared as supporting characters in Nolan’s 2006 film The Prestige, 2010 film Inception and Pixar’s 2011 film Cars 2.

Caine is one of only two actors nominated for an Academy Award for acting in every decade from the 1960s to 2000s (the other one being Jack Nicholson). In 2000, Caine was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in recognition of his contribution to cinema.

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Britt Ekland – Rare Photographic Print of Britt Ekland | Colour Photograph | Unseen Photo

BRITT EKLAND, APRIL, 1978

britt ekland david steen archiveIMPORTANT NOTE:

THE WATERMARK AND THE SIGNATURE ON THE IMAGE WILL NOT BE PRESENT ON AN ORIGINAL PRINT.

 

Britt-Marie Ekland (born 6 October 1942) is a Swedish actress and singer, and a long time resident of the United Kingdom. She is best known for her roles as a Bond girl in The Man with the Golden Gun, and in the British cult horror film The Wicker Man, as well as her marriage to actor Peter Sellers, and her high-profile social life.

She was the Bond girl in the 1974 James Bond movie The Man with the Golden Gun. Other notable film appearances include The Night They Raided Minsky’s, Baxter!,The Double Man, Get Carter (in the 1999 BBC television series I Love the ’70s she hosted the 1971 episode in homage to her role as “Anna” in the film), and the 1973 cult film The Wicker Man (for which her voice was dubbed to disguise her Swedish-accented English). In 1975 she provided “whispers” in French on the end of then boyfriend Rod Stewart’s Tonight’s the Night (Gonna Be Alright).

Ekland also portrayed biographical characters, such as the one based on real-life actress Anny Ondra (boxer Max Schmeling’s wife) in the television movie Ring of Passion (1978), and prostitute Mariella Novotny in the feature film Scandal (1989) about the Profumo affair.

She has guest starred on various TV shows, including an appearance on the popular TV series Superboy, playing Lara, Superboy’s biological mother, during the show’s second season in 1990. Ekland published a beauty and fitness book in 1984 Sensual Beauty: How to achieve it, followed by a fitness video in 1992. Ekland credits her personal trainer, Herb Genendelis, for a workout regimen that has kept her in “show biz shape”.

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Dudley Moore & Peter Cook | Rare Photographic Print of Dudley Moore & Peter Cook | Black & White Photograph | Unseen Photo

Dudley Moore & Peter Cook

 

IMPORTANT NOTES:

THIS CLOSE UP HEADSHOT OF PETER COOK & DUDLEY MOORE WAS ONLY RECENTLY UNEARTHED FROM THE ARCHIVE AND HAS NEVER BEEN OFFERED IN PRINT FORM BEFORE. IMAGE RELEASED 1ST JUNE, 2012. TO THIS DAY, THE IMAGE IS STILL USED ON THE FRONT COVER OF ‘THE BEST OF PETER COOK & DUDLEY MOORE’, VOLUME ONE.

THE WATERMARK AND THE SIGNATURE ON THE IMAGE WILL NOT BE PRESENT ON AN ORIGINAL PRINT

Dudley Moore & Peter Cook | RARE CELEBRITY PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS BY DAVID STEENPeter Edward Cook (17 November 1937 – 9 January 1995) was an English actor, satirist, writer and comedian. An extremely influential figure in modern British comedy, he is regarded as the leading light of the British satire boom of the 1960s. Cook has been described as “the funniest man who ever drew breath”, although his work was also controversial. Cook was closely associated with anti-establishment comedy which emerged in Britain and the United States in the late 1950s.

 

Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (19 April 1935 – 27 March 2002) was an English actor, comedian, composer and musician.

Moore first came to prominence as one of the four writer-performers in the ground-breaking comedy revue Beyond the Fringe in the early 1960s, and then became famous as half of the highly popular television double-act he formed with Peter Cook.

His fame as a comedy film actor was later heightened by success in hit Hollywood films such as Foul Play, 10 with Bo Derek and Arthur in the late 1970s and early 1980s, respectively. He received an Oscar nomination for the latter role. He was frequently referred to in the media as “Cuddly Dudley” or “The Sex Thimble”, a reference to his short stature and reputation as a “ladies’ man”.

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Jack Palance | Rare Photographic Print of Jack Palance | Black & White Photograph | Unseen Photo

JACK PALANCE, AS VOLTAN, HAWK THE SLAYER, LONDON, MARCH, 1980

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He exemplified evil incarnate on film — portraying some of the most intense and gripping villains witnessed in 50s westerns and melodrama — and Jack Palance went on to win Oscar “Best Supporting Actor” nominations for two of them. It would take a grizzled, eccentric comic performance 40 years later, however, in order to grab the coveted statuette.

 

Of Ukranian descent, Palance was born Volodymir Ivanovich Palahniuk on February 18, 1919, in Pennsylvania coal country. His father, a miner, died of black lung disease. The sensitive, artistic lad worked in the mines in his early years but averted the same fate as his father. Athletics was his ticket out of the mines when he won a football scholarship to the University of North Carolina. He subsequently dropped out to try his hand at professional boxing. Although he certainly had talent and a good boxing record, he decided on a less abusive way of life. After decorated WWII service with the Army Air Force as a bomber pilot, he resumed college studies as a journalist at Stanford University and became a sportswriter for the San Francisco Chronicle. He also worked for a radio station until the acting bug bit.

 

Palance made his stage debut in “The Big Two” in 1947 and immediately followed it understudying Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski in Broadway’s “A Streetcar Named Desire,” a role he eventually took over. Following stage parts in “Temporary Island” (1948), “The Vigil” (1948) and “The Silver Tassle” (1949), Palance won a choice role in “Darkness of Noon” and also the Theatre World Award for “promising new personality”. This recognition helped him secure a 20th Century-Fox contract. Facial burns and resulting reconstructive surgery following the crash and burn of his WWII bomber plane actually worked to the leathery actor’s advantage in Hollywood. Hardly the look of a glossy romantic leading man, Palance instead became an archetypal villain equipped with an imposing glare, intimidating stance and killer-shark smile. In his movie debut in Elia Kazan’s Panic in the Streets (1950), he stood out among a powerful cast as a fugitive carrying the bubonic plague. He was soon on his way.

 

Initially billed as Walter Jack Palance, he made fine use of his former boxing skills and war experience for the film Halls of Montezuma (1950) as a boxing Marine in Richard Widmark’s platoon. Palance followed this with the first of his back-to-back Oscar nods. In Sudden Fear (1952), only his third film, he played rich-and-famous playwright Joan Crawford’s struggling actor husband who plots to murder her and run off with gorgeous Gloria Grahame. Finding the right menace and intensity to pretty much steal the proceedings, he followed this with arguably his finest film role of the decade, that of creepy, sadistic gunslinger Jack Wilson who becomes Alan Ladd’s biggest nightmare (not to mention others) in the classic western Shane (1953). Their climactic showdown alone is text book.

 

Along the way there were some very good films such as Man in the Attic (1953), which was his first lead, The Big Knife (1955) and the war classic Attack (1956) mixed in with the highly mediocre Flight to Tangier (1953), Sign of the Pagan (1954), in which he played Attila the Hun, and the biblical bomb The Silver Chalice (1954). In between these filmings there were a host of powerful TV roles — none better than his down-and-out boxer in “Requiem for a Heavyweight” (1956), a rare sympathetic role that earned him an Emmy.

 

Overseas in the 1960s, he made a killing in bible/war epics and “spaghetti westerns” which included The Barbarians (1960) Barabbas (1961) [Barabbas], and The Fall of the Giants (1969) [A Bullet for Rommel]. Also included in his 60s foreign work was his participation in the Jean-Luc Godard masterpiece Le Mépris (1963) [Contempt]. On TV he played a number of nefarious nasties to perfection ranging from Dracula to Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde. Into his twilight years he showed a penchant for brash, quirky ,comedy capped by his Oscar-winning role in City Slickers (1991), its sequel, and others. He even played Ebenezer Scrooge in a TV-movie incongruously set in the Wild West.

 

Married twice, his three children — Holly, Brooke and Cody (who died in 1998 of cancer) — all dabbled in acting and appeared with their father at one time or another. A man of few words off the set, he owned his own cattle ranch and displayed other creative sides as a exhibited painter and published poet. His last years were marred by failing health and he died at age 87 of natural causes at his daughter Holly’s Montecito, California home.

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Twiggy | Rare Photographic Print of Twiggy | Colour Photograph | Unseen Photo

Twiggy, David Steen’s Home, 1967

twiggyTwiggy was born in north London on September 19th, 1949. She was named “The Face of ’66” by the Daily Express. In the mid 60’s at 16 years of age, Twiggy became internationally known as the world’s first supermodel, her photographic modeling success epitomising the age.

 

Twiggy went on to become a successful actress in film, stage and television, beginning her acting career by starring in Ken Russell’s film “The Boyfriend“, for which she won two Golden Globe awards; most promising newcomer and best actress in a musical. She has recorded many albums since, encompassing a variety of styles including pop, rock, disco, country and show tunes. Twiggy’s successful recordings have earned her two silver discs, two chart albums and hit singles.

 

Twiggy had considerable success with her own variety series for the BBC and her portrayal of Eliza Doolitle in Yorkshire TV’s production of “Pygmalion” was highly praised. She then had outstanding success in the Tony Award winning Gershwin musical “My One and Only”. The musical ran for nearly two years and she was nominated for a Tony Award for her performance.

 

Twiggy continued to act in film and TV in the U.S. and U.K. with parts in “The Doctor and the Devils”, “Club Paradise”, “The Blues Brothers”, “The Little Match Girl”, and “Young Charlie Chaplin” to name but a few. In 1988 Twiggy married British Actor/Director Leigh Lawson who starred with her and Shirley MacLaine in “Madame Sousatzka” directed by John Schlesinger.

 

The 90’s launched her into a career as TV presenter and interviewer with her own ITV series ‘Twiggy’s People’, interviewing amongst others, Dustin Hoffman, Lauren Bacall, Tom Jones, Joan Rivers, Eric Idle and Tim Curry. In 2001, Twiggy recorded a second TV series for the ITV network ‘Take Time With Twiggy’, interviewing such stars as Lulu, Ken Russell and Frederick Forsyth.

 

She co-produced and starred in the critically acclaimed, “If Love Were All” in New York directed by Leigh Lawson. Her autobiography, “Twiggy In Black and White” entered the bestseller list and her new album Romantically Yours was released to lauded reviews in the music press. Her timeless beauty transcends the decades and she continues to model, featuring on the cover of numerous magazines, “Vogue”, “Tatler” etc.

 

Twiggy is an ardent supporter of animal welfare through numerous societies – an anti fur campaigner, and is known also for her support of breast cancer research groups.

 

Since 2005 Twiggy has been part of the phenomenally successful Marks & Spencer advertising campaign. Twiggy has also been a guest judge on the top US reality show America’s Next Top Model opposite the shows creator Tyra Banks.

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Twiggy | Rare Photographic Print of Twiggy | Black & White Photograph | Unseen Photo

TWIGGY

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Cliff Richard | Rare Photographic Print of Cliff Richard | Colour Photograph | Unseen Photo

CLIFF RICHARD IN HIS SILVER CORVETTE STINGRAY, ON TOUR, ENGLAND, APRIL, 1964

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David Steen: “During his series of one-nighters Cliff drove himself from town to town, gig to gig, in his left-hand-drive Corvette Stingray. He was a good driver and loved cars. At that time he also had a Cadillac Fleetway limousine. I spent three days on the road with him.”

IMPORTANT NOTES:

THIS COLOUR IMAGE WAS RECENTLY UNEARTHED FROM THE ARCHIVE AND HAS NEVER BEEN SEEN, PUBLISHED OR PRINTED BEFORE. IMAGE RELEASED 1ST JUNE, 2012

THE WATERMARK AND THE SIGNATURE ON THE IMAGE WILL NOT BE PRESENT ON AN ORIGINAL PRINT.

Sir Cliff Richard, OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb; 14 October 1940) is a British pop singer, musician, performer, actor, and philanthropist. With his backing group The Shadows, Richard, originally positioned as a rebellious rock and roll singer in the style of Little Richard and Elvis Presley, dominated the British popular music scene in the pre-Beatles period of the late 1950s and early 1960s. His 1958 hit single “Move It” is often described as Britain’s first authentic rock and roll song and John Lennon once claimed that “before Cliff and the Shadows, there had been nothing worth listening to in British music.” A conversion to Christianity and subsequent softening of his music later led to a more middle of the road pop image, sometimes venturing into gospel music.

Over a 53-year career, Richard has become a fixture of the British entertainment world, amassing many gold and platinum discs and awards, including three Brit awards and two Ivor Novello awards. He has had more than 130 singles, albums and EPs make the UK Top 20, more than any other artist and holds the record (with Elvis Presley) as the only act to make the UK singles charts in all of its first six decades (1950s–2000s). He has achieved 14 UK No. 1 singles (or 18, depending on the counting methodology) and is the only singer to have had a No. 1 single in the UK in six consecutive decades: the 1950s through to the 2000s (discounting digital downloads and counting only CDs, he also had a UK No. 1 single in the 2000s). Richard is the biggest selling singles artist of all time in the UK, with total sales of over 21 million and has reportedly sold an estimated 250 million records worldwide.

Richard has never achieved the same impact in the United States despite eight US Top 40 singles, including the million-selling “Devil Woman” and “We Don’t Talk Anymore”, the latter becoming the first to reach the Hot 100’s top 40 in the 1980s by a singer who had been in the top 40 in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. In Canada, Richard achieved moderate success in the 1980s with several albums reaching platinum status. He has remained a popular music, film and television personality in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Northern Europe and Asia and he retains a following in other countries.

Acquire This Photographic Print of Cliff Richard by David Steen

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Actors

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